A Biden B2B Doctrine for Economic Empowerment

by Bobby Reyes

Then-President of Mexico Enrique Peña Nieto with then-Vice President Joe Biden. | Photo by Presidencia de la República Mexicana via Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0

The Atlantic had a story using the term “Biden Doctrine” when then-Vice President Biden visited Latin America in 2016. Thus, we at the Philippine Daily Mirror cannot claim to have originated the name. On Oct. 26, 2020, The Atlantic had a follow-up story of what Biden may do in Latin America if he were elected president.

However, we wish to suggest a “Back-to-Basics (B2B) Doctrine” to President-elect and soon the POTUS Biden for economic development. And this column has enumerated and discussed in 10 articles (and counting) how a President Biden could begin it. The idea of a “Biden B2B Doctrine” should not only go for the healing and socio-economic development of the United States, especially among its poor citizens but also in helping Mexico. And aiding our Southern neighbors turn their country into the fifth-biggest economy in the world by 2050 — per the 2014 proposal of former Mexican President Vicente Fox. Mexico is the third leg of the old North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In turn, Mexicans can lead the NAFTA Zone’s efforts in extending reforms and socio-economic progress to Central and South America and the Caribbean nations.

Nearly 10 months earlier than The Atlantic’s posting, we posted an Open Letter to Biden on Facebook on Jan. 27, 2020, with suggestions to the Democratic policy and decision-makers.

“The idea of a “Biden B2B Doctrine” should not only go for the healing and socio-economic development of the United States, especially among its poor citizens but also in helping Mexico. And aiding our Southern neighbors turn their country into the fifth-biggest economy in the world by 2050 — per the 2014 proposal of former Mexican President Vicente Fox.”

We wrote that as President Biden, he may be able to reinvent the present “Crony Capitalism” into one that I will call the “Cooperative Capitalism.” I say this because, with capitalism, the people — even the present students of the country’s business schools — lack the capital to compete with the giants of corporate America and the multinational conglomerates.

We also posted in several Democratic Facebook Groups – including Joe Biden for President – this “unsolicited advice,” with the title: “PSEED Platforms: Solving Unfunded Pension Funds, Homelessness, Save the USPS, and Other Crises While Doing Immigration Reform.” I will discuss a summary of the suggested projects in the next episode of this column. PSEED is the acronym of the “People’s Socio-Economic and Environmental Development.”

” … many politicians talk about the economic empowerment of the financially-distressed minorities and poor Caucasians. But they do nothing about it. Instead of helping the poor, the truth is that many politicians from major political parties prefer to support Corporate America with trillions of support in tax cuts, buying of corporate bonds, and other stimulus grants. The poor only get lip service.”

In addition, we provided the Democratic National Committee with copies of our proposals to then-presidential candidate Joe Biden. But so far, the recipients have not favored us with even the courtesy of an acknowledgment.

The American economy’s problem is that many politicians talk about the economic empowerment of the financially-distressed minorities and poor Caucasians. But they do nothing about it. Instead of helping the poor, the truth is that many politicians from major political parties prefer to support Corporate America with trillions of support in tax cuts, buying of corporate bonds, and other stimulus grants. The poor only get lip service. Because many politicians are NATO in orientation, per Filipino American pundits. Yes, NATO, as in “No Action, Talk Only.”

Some B2B Ideas for Economic Empowerment of the Poor

I also circulated in 2017 this proposal to Democratic Facebook Groups: “Democrats Must Promote Economic Empowerment for the Poor Caucasians and Minority Americans.” I last edited it on Oct. 26, 2017.

Here are the main points of my proposals:

  1. The revival of the cotton industry in the Southern U.S. Most of the cotton farmers and workers were African-Americans sharecroppers. My suggestion was to cultivate the cotton crop again and establish modern and computerized cotton gins and factories that would turn out fabrics for the clothing industry. And even produce uniforms for law-enforcement agencies, the military, and hospital and healthcare industries.
  2. To help young African and Latino youth (mostly young Puerto Ricans and Guamanians) take up nursing and other medical industry fields. (My proposal would be prophetic because the World Health Organization would announce in 2019 — before the pandemic — that there would be a global shortage of some 6.0-million nurses by 2030. And the pandemic has magnified the need for nurses and other medical professionals.)
  3. Organizing Call Centers in the United States for transcribing medical or legal records and documents or serving as Customer-support Centers for Corporate America — instead of the practice of farming them out to countries like India and the Philippines.
  4. Assisting minority communities in organizing construction cooperatives for the present and future repairs of America’s crumbling transportation infrastructures (like roads, bridges, tunnels, etc.), and persuading the African or Latino superstars in football, baseball, basketball, boxing, and other sports or in the movie industry to invest in the construction named earlier workers’ co-ops.
  5. Turning Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands into new versions of Hawaii, as island-tourism oases for domestic and foreign visitors.

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