Bill Gates and AC 360 Just Validated Our Futuristic Views

by Bobby Reyes

“Bill Gates” | Photo by Thomas Hawk via Flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0

Unwittingly Bill Gates and Anderson Cooper “talked about” on CNN last Saturday night some of what we discussed in the Philippine Daily Mirror. Mr. Gates frequently talked of the need for the world to invest in Research and Development (R&D).

On the other hand, we have been discussing in The Straphanger column in the PDM the need for the United States to emulate what then-President William McKinley and Civil Governor William Howard Taft did the first Overseas-American Medical Center (MedCenter) in Manila in the 1900s. An R&D facility is the third leg of a MedCenter, the two others being schools of medicine/nursing and a general hospital. And we advocated building 50 of the MedCenters in strategic locations in the world to combat the present-and-future pandemics.

Then Mr. Gates talked also about developing a “synthetic beef,” as cows are some of the primary sources of methane.

On May 1, 2017, I organized a Pacific-Islander Diet (P-I Diet) Facebook Group, a revival of how Pacific Islanders’ ancestors ate. They had “No rice, no sugar, no pork, and no beef” in their diet for ages.

More or less, Mr. Gates predicted that by 2100, the world would not be able to tolerate the raising of cows and thus the need for “synthetic beef.” And presumably also for almond milk and other organic-and-sustainable substitutes for cattle products. In short, the world will be living (and eating) by then — like the ancestors of Pacific Islanders thousands of years ago.

” … Mr. Gates predicted that by 2100, the world would not be able to tolerate the raising of cows and thus the need for “synthetic beef.” And presumably also for almond milk and other organic-and-sustainable substitutes for cattle products.”

Casting modesty aside, I discussed more detailed projects for the future — in nearly three months — in my PDM column than that discussed in the said AC 360 interview. Of course, it is hard to provide many details of Mr. Gates’ ideas in just one hour.

Hopefully, Mr. Gates will reply to my correspondence to request him to consider some of the ideas discussed in the PDM. One never knows how things will turn out. But his interview — at the AC 360 — made him sound like the PDM spokesman, if not the rah-rah cheerleader (sort of) of the bright ideas for the foreseeable future.

And finally, Mr. Gates discussed what will probably happen when the world celebrates New Year in 2100. On Dec. 24, 2010, I wrote a futuristic article about my forecast of what Christmas would be like in Sorsogon Province and other areas of the Philippines in the year 2112. Aha, I was ahead by 12 years in predicting life by that time!

Is this columnist the “Nostradamus of Sorsogon”?

” … Mr. Gates discussed what will probably happen when the world celebrates New Year in 2100. On Dec. 24, 2010, I wrote a futuristic article about my forecast of what Christmas would be like in Sorsogon Province and other areas of the Philippines in the year 2112. Aha, I was ahead by 12 years in predicting life by that time!”

Some of my childhood friends in high school in the 1960s thought that I had an inborn gift of seeing a future vision. Thus, some of them called me later “the Sorsoganon Nostradamus.” But on the other hand, some called me the “crazy Don Quixote of Sorsogon.”

Many of my sixth-grade classmates in a public school in 1958 were amazed by my prediction that two of our girl classmates would be class valedictorians (and a third one the salutatorian). I also said I would graduate as valedictorian in high school in 1962. And I had the guts to name the three girl classmates. At that time, there were only three high schools in the capital town of Sorsogon (now Sorsogon City). Four years later, my prediction exactly happened as I foretold. Please read this narrative of how I demonstrated my gift as a visionary student in sixth grade.

In my 2010 article, I wrote about Christmas in 2112. I mentioned my prediction that in 2041, “a Spanish-Philippine-American-Mexican (S.P.A.M.) consortium started building in Magallanes City in Sorsogon (now Ibalon) Province ultra-modern gigantic galleons powered by the wind and the sun, for the world ran out of crude oil in 2050.” It restarted the Galleon Trade between Magallanes City (Philippines) to Acapulco (Mexico) and other ports in California (USA) and Spain.

I wrote further: “By 2051, Mexico became the world’s fifth-biggest economy followed by California, which regained its economic clout as the sixth-biggest economy in the world. The Philippines then became the conduit of Mexico, Spain, and the United States, principally led by California, to the Southeast-Asian Economic Market, which region now rivals the economies of China, Japan and Korea combined.”

And as I mentioned earlier in this column, in 2014, I met in a symposium former Mexican President Vicente Fox, the guest speaker. He predicted in his speech that “Mexico would become the fifth-biggest economy in the world by 2050.” Boy, my prediction made in December 2010 was off by one year.

“By 2051, Mexico became the world’s fifth-biggest economy followed by California, which regained its economic clout as the sixth-biggest economy in the world. The Philippines then became the conduit of Mexico, Spain, and the United States, principally led by California, to the Southeast-Asian Economic Market, which region now rivals the economies of China, Japan and Korea combined.”

Now, I have another prediction to make. Ricky Rillera of the PDM will be thrilled when one of these coming days, the PinoyLife, the Filipino American Press Club of New York, and the PDM would co-host a town hall meeting in New York City. Some of the guests will be Bill Gates, former President Vicente Fox, Mike R. Bloomberg, James D. Robinson III, his son James Robinson IV, Numeriano Bouffard of the Pueblo Filipino of Manzanillo City (Mexico), and other visionaries. Anderson Cooper will serve as the main moderator. The meeting will discuss more happenings in the future — as they (and, ahem, as I) predicted. But when that happens, the PDM office or even the CNN premises would be too small to host the invited speakers plus representatives of the 193 member countries of the United Nations. I would not bet against it happening in the hall of the UN General Assembly. Of course, the American and international media will send hundreds of journalists and broadcasters to report about it.

If that happens, will the world by then call this journalist the “Filipino Nostradamus”?

By next week, we will talk about my 1996 idea of turning “Tennessee Into an Island.” I registered the domain name, www.tnsea.net, for this visionary idea.

After that, I will resurrect another idea that I submitted to the leaders of the Fourth Estate of Detroit, MI. My concept was about turning Motown and its suburbs into the “Las Vegas of the Future.” I submitted the idea in private meetings during the August 2011 annual convention of the Asian-American Journalists Association (AAJA). I was a guest at the AAJA convention by its corporate sponsor, the General Motors’ Buick Division. But all of them gave me the due courtesy and of being nice to a fellow journalist, but they probably threw my proposal into the wastebasket or deleted its e-mailed version.

But we, journalists, are used to rejection slips. Because in life, you lose some, you win some. But in the end, when you keep pushing for the goal, the manuscript gets published sooner or later.

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