Changing the Term “EDSA Evolution” in North America to “EDEN”

by Bobby Reyes

Organic farming in the Philippines -1 | By DFAT Photo Library via Commons/Flickr

Part III of an “EDEN America” series

Mar G. de Vera is a Pangasinense journalist and book author in Los Angeles. He was the editor-in-chief of both the Filipino Journal and the Manila Standard-Los Angeles newspaper in the late 1980s. This writer values the suggestions of Mr. De Vera, who was his boss in the said two publications. He says that EDSA is now a lousy acronym, as it promotes divisiveness among the various factions and political parties in the Philippines. Why? Because the principal characters of the 1986 and 2001 EDSA Revolutions I and II continue (through their kin and cronies) their clashes for political supremacy and greed in the country. Secondly, this columnist described in 1988 the Philippine archipelago as “an economic purgatory.”

Ergo, I came up with a new acronym, “EDEN.” It stands for “Economic Development of an Evolution for a Nation.” Or it can mean “Economic Development of an Evolution for North America” (EDEN America). Why should we all suffer from the pang and pain of purgatory (as described in some holy books) when we can have a modern or even a semblance or doable version of a mythical Eden?

There are many reactions and feedback from readers — even from the Philippines. A group of a thousand (or more) Filipino trained security personnel (with their respective spouse and children that are at least high-school graduates) are interested in helping push the mission of economic empowerment for OFWs and the Overseas Filipino Melting Pot (as discussed in this column). They are willing to study nursing or other medical courses to help humanity, especially in these trying times of a pandemic. We are starting a dialogue with the leaders of the said group, the members of which can also join what this writer calls the “SWATT Team” (if they cannot qualify to become medical professionals). Yes, the “Social Workers, They can field agriculturists, technicians and technocrats” teams and help save American farms and revive abandoned towns in some rural areas in the United States. And spearhead the “Greening of North America.”

Another reader says that a Southeast Asian country may be interested in the herbal project (complete with the cannabis operations). The proponent and this columnist may soon organize an OFW-led trade mission to that country to make the needed presentation. And negotiate.

“The world is dependent on inorganic chemicals that harm humans and wildlife, which must be lessened. The proposed venture in herbs and herbal plants can address this (including the legal cultivation of cannabis). We can do this with natural (environmentally safe) products.”

And a Fil-Am Chamber of Commerce president wants to help do the “EDSA Evolution,” oops, “EDEN AMERICA” by doing town-hall meetings in strategic locations in the U.S.A. The public gatherings — initially by Zoom –– may lead to the further unification of OFW and Overseas-Filipino groups.

What do you think, Dear Readers? Is Mr. De Vera right in his view about the “EDSA”?

The world is dependent on inorganic chemicals that harm humans and wildlife, which must be lessened. The proposed venture in herbs and herbal plants can address this (including the legal cultivation of cannabis). We can do this with natural (environmentally safe) products. We have been talking with a group of American-trained bio-chemists from Japan about converting starfish into pesticides. This columnist coined “fishticide” (combining starfish with pesticide) to best describe the project. Some biochemists in Japan had been working on this project.

But the global chemical-pesticide industry of the world “killed” the project. Why? Because industrial firms cannot obtain patents on using the starfish as building blocks for pesticides that could be used safely in agriculture (and even in backyard gardening) without harming the environment.

This writer has a copy of the abstract of such a novel project that would also clean up beaches of the millions of starfish and other similar wildlife that frequently die off due to the rising temperature of seawater. Perhaps environmental groups in North America can help push this project in collaboration with some Japanese team members, many of whom have doctorates in biochemistry.

And finally, this writer penned amid this once-in-a-hundred-year pandemic the story of how some families in the Province of Sorsogon (Philippines) survived earlier pandemics by using herbs, natural medicine, and volcanic water.

“These are some functions that will help future generations of humanity deal with many problems that affect the viability of lives, science, the economy, and the environment. Filipinos can, and should, do more to help themselves and the world at large.”

In a Facebook Note, I wrote “Surviving the Flu-type Pandemics — With the Aid of Herbs & Natural Medicine and Volcanic Water.” (Its subtitle is How The Reyes Clan and Other Sorsoganons Survived the Spanish-Flu and Asian-Flu Pandemics — With the Help of Herbs and Natural Medicine”).

As discussed earlier in this column, a badly-needed institute would do research and development in an “R-&-D Center” that many politicians in several countries refuse to fund. Or do due to their corrupt ways and practices. The Overseas-Filipino Melting Pot can do its share of studying ways and means to make our world a lot better without toxic fuel, deadly chemicals, and even harmful consumer items.

The U.S.A. started an R&D Center. It serves as one of the three components of a Medical Center in Manila in the 1900s mentioned in an earlier series. Many Filipino staff members, especially researchers, have been sent by the U.S. government to complete their education and training in American colleges and universities. The Filipino people can do the same tasks again by doing public-private partnerships.

These are some functions that will help future generations of humanity deal with many problems that affect the viability of lives, science, the economy, and the environment. Filipinos can, and should, do more to help themselves and the world at large. Yes, instead of the Filipino homeland being labeled one of the most corrupt countries and probably the most impotent government in dealing with pandemics, poverty, and other social ills.

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