Democracy Wins Big in the Midterm Elections; Mr. Trump Is Its Biggest Loser

by Bobby Reyes

Voters at the Londonderry High School in Londonderry, NH lining up to enter to vote | Photo by Sdkb via Wikimedia Commons

Part XXX: “Florida, the State of the Future” Series

The Republicans expected a majority of at least 60-seats in the House of Representatives as their gain in this year’s election. But it looks like the GOP will have a slim plurality of 3-to-5 seats in the House after the tabulation of the election results is officially finished. The average number of congressional seats lost by a first-term President’s party is said to be 31.
On the other hand, it looks like the Democrats and independent allies will have 51 seats, or more, in the U.S. Senate. It means that the Democrats have at least a one-seat safety margin. Or the luxury of allowing a single Democratic senator to abstain or even vote with the minority. And still, they can approve legislation that requires only the Vice President to cast the deciding vote.

But the public knows that President Biden has the veto power. He can, therefore, veto any legislation passed by the House of Representatives GOP members — if it also passes in the Senate. And the Republicans do not have the necessary votes to override the veto.

At the start of the 2022 election cycle, the GOP predicted that it would have at least a majority of 60 members in the House of Representatives and control of the Senate (even by one vote). In reality, a party needs a majority of at least 20-seats to govern effectively in the House. The American voters disapproved of their plans in yesterday’s election.

Neither the Democrats nor the Republicans won the 2022 elections. Democracy won. How? The voters rejected the election bid of nearly all the Republican candidates that were “chosen” as party bets by former President Trump. This columnist argues that many Republican voters did not vote for Mr. Trump’s favored candidates, many of whom he endorsed and financed by his political-action committee. Perhaps a substantial number of GOP voters do not support his claims that the 2020 presidential election was “stolen” by the Democrats. And they used their respective vote to deliver the message to Mr. Trump.

“The biggest loser of this year’s national elections is former President Trump. As some pundits write, Mr. Trump “grabbed defeat from the jaws of victory” through his irrational political behavior this political cycle. Perhaps Mr. Trump should simply act now as a dignified statesman and forget any future political plan for himself and, or his children.

Perhaps American voters decided they did not want to reside in a Third-World country and become the butt of jokes by foreigners. They do not want defeated politicians to refuse to concede and even organize a violent mob to prevent the winner’s proclamation.

Economic issues and even abortion did not become the deciding factor. It is safe to assume that voters did not like politicians to deprive them of their right to select the best candidate to deliver the best public service.

The biggest loser of this year’s national elections is former President Trump. As some pundits write, Mr. Trump “grabbed defeat from the jaws of victory” through his irrational political behavior this political cycle. Perhaps Mr. Trump should simply act now as a dignified statesman and forget any future political plan for himself and, or his children.

By the way, this political commentary is part of this series about Florida becoming the “State of the Future.” Why? Because the Republicans defeated all their Democrat opponents for elective positions that require votes of Floridians in the entire state.
Yes, the Sunshine State can be the epicenter and model of bipartisanship. The fact that no Democrat won any state-wide election in Florida gives President Biden a chance to demonstrate bipartisanship in doing the projects suggested by some Floridians — as this column ventilates. And hopefully, the suggested “Public-and-Private Partnerships” (PPP) can initiate and do some of all the viable projects.

In the next column, this writer will expound more of this suggestion.

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