Endless Summers

by Steve Van Derodar

Kayaking in Cadlo Island, El Nido, Palawan | Photo by Lancegio2020 via Wikimedia Commons

It has been hot lately. Summer is soon here! The increasing temp makes us all excited to change to lighter dresses, loosen up a bit, and to some degree, put on our speedos and swimsuits. But wait, I know of a country that seemingly has endless summers, The Philippines!

While most parts of the world do have seasons, the Philippines enjoys a temperate climate. The Philippines has a tropical maritime climate that is usually hot and humid. There are three seasons: a hot, dry season or summer from March to May; a rainy season from June to November; and a cool, dry season from December to February. The average yearly temperature is around 26.6 °C (79.9 °F).

In a commentary on an opinion site, Raf Gatchalian comments, “It will be a surprise to many Filipinos that summer is not one of the two seasons in the Philippines. Most countries of the world, in fact, have only two seasons. This is because most countries lie within the tropical zone. The hot dry season is the misperceived summer by the Filipinos. It is inconsistent to any of the descriptions of summer whether astronomical or meteorological, not even to the Google definition of summer to be the warmest season of the year. Because the warmest time of the year in the Philippines happens when thunderstorms are already frequently experienced which falls in the month of May. While it may not yet be officially the rainy season, it is no longer dry to still be part of our pseudo-summer. Clearly, the Philippine summer is a filipinism that means the best time of the year to go frolic or just bask near a body of water. I noticed that our local weather bureau, PAGASA, started making an attempt to correct that notion. Anyhow, that won’t make these beautiful islands any less of a perfect summer destination with hundreds of awe-inspiring beaches of pristine turquoise waters and powdery white sand.”

Whether it is filipinism or not obviously, summers are spent in various destinations in the Philippines. But overall, any month is quite okay to spend time and enjoy vacations. A close relative who owns a resort in Hagnaya, Northern Cebu, would agree that there is still a constant influx of travelers year-round pre-pandemic while there are peak seasons.

“The Philippines has a tropical maritime climate that is usually hot and humid. There are three seasons: a hot, dry season or summer from March to May; a rainy season from June to November; and a cool, dry season from December to February.”

Can you imagine having a property near the beach in the Philippines? The idea of summer in the Philippines can be much worth spending. In fact, almost any day of a year feels like a summer. Like definitely, you can book accommodations any day without the fear of bad weather except for a few typhoons. I have been to Boracay in different months, and it’s always beautiful and inviting. Today, you can name as many developers part taking the commercial magnet of such a gem.

As most summers are spent with family, many families spend timeshare and vacation time in destinations or those who own properties in leisure properties in many parts of the country. The beaches, cabanas, canopies, etc., are sights typical of vacations. Many residential developers also offer attraction to their developments that have the “vacation feel” even when it is purely residential. Also, when you look up online, many independent owners operate guesthouses, beachfront accommodations, and apartments near the beach.

As a 5th-year college student, on my internship, I actually spent 2 months in a beach resort in Balamban, Cebu, where I rented a regular unit as my accommodation. Why not? I was able to negotiate a place to stay near the hospital that I was reporting to without paying the regular daily rate plus the food service I was getting as part of the package. I guess I was the salesman then who knew what a reasonable offer was.

When I was a kid, we would often go to the Northern part of Cebu as my parents are from there, and luckily both my paternal and maternal grandparents’ houses are stone-throw away to the shorelines. The beachline and the waters are always calling us to dip into the waters every single day. To this day, I have vivid memories of summers spent with cousins, collecting starfishes, and getting tan-skinned at the end of every vacation.

“The beauty in these destinations is that there are developments intended for short vacations or to own properties that are both family-centric and leisure-oriented but can also be profitable if you choose to make it a passive income.”

While living in Makati, I would often see families either go South or North for summer vacations like Punta Fuego in Batangas, Anvaya Cove in Bataan, Zambales, La Union, Baguio (for cooler temp adventures). Should I say, generally, where there is water, people go. In Southern Philippines, Sta Fe, Bantayan, Cebu; Panglao, Bohol; Dakak – Dapitan; Puerto Princesa – Palawan; Oslob, Moalbo-al in Cebu; Camiguin, Siargao and of course Mactan, Lapu-Lapu City; etc., There are just tons of places to go to. Because the Philippines is an archipelago consisting of about 7,640 islands, you can expect various visits.

The beauty in these destinations is that there are developments intended for short vacations or to own properties that are both family-centric and leisure-oriented but can also be profitable if you choose to make it a passive income. I have a handful of relatives who have few cabanas to rent out to in Sta Fe, Cebu, and are very accommodating to guests. You may be agreeable to the idea that one day choosing “a life under the sun” can mean owning a beach property for a living. Remember, it doesn’t have to be a large property. It could be a timeshare, a rental property, guesthouses, vacation accommodations, your own retirement place, etc.

Also, it’s nice noting that foreign arrivals have been increasing pre-pandemic because of the variety of offerings in the Philippines. In fact, even if we have our own sort of rock beach, an underdeveloped private beach, where we regard it as a summer hide-out, I still think that going to other parts of the country gives you more exploration of the Philippines’ wonders. Some places in the Philippines, too, have been considered biodiversity havens.

Endless summers can mean quality time spent in places of leisurely stays, be it temporary or long-term. Owning a property can be one way of achieving it where you can expect a place to call home during summertime and even year-round. Endless summers can also mean an unending appreciation of the tropical paradise inherently our own.

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(Stevenson’s experience in Philippine Real Estate spans more than 15 years. He has been involved in horizontal, vertical, vacation, and commercial properties. He has worked as an International Property Specialist in Asia, Europe, and North America with Ayala Land, Federal Land, and Century Properties. PhilHouseHunters offers real estate investment opportunities, marketing, and consultancy with a key focus on Metro Manila and Mega Cebu areas. Visit www.philhousehunters.com. Email at derodarsales@gmail.com.)

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