Examining the DNA of “Filipino Melting Pot” Members

by Bobby Reyes

DNA Sequencing | Photo by Linda Bartlett via Wikimedia Commons

Part XVII of “The Filipino Melting Pot” Series

In Part II of this series, I mentioned how the native-Indio (Indian) people of Mexico welcomed Filipino-Indio deserters — starting in the 16th century. Some of the Filipino galleon crew members jumped ship every time a Spanish galleon reached the ports of Mexico, then a colony of Spain. I made perhaps the first-ever claim that the spouses of the Filipino-Indio deserters might have had Mayan or Aztec bloodlines. And possibly DNA tests may be able to confirm my hypothesis.

I mentioned in Part II my hypothesis: “Imagine Filipinos being people with DNA from Malays, indigenous Taiwanese, Austronesian, other Asians, Chinese, Japanese, Arabians, (Asian) Indians, Iberians, Americans, British, other Europeans, and now Mayan-Aztec.” Indeed, I created the Filipino Melting Pot, and called its members in the 1980s, the “first citizens of the world.”

May is the Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. It is a celebration of Asian and Pacific Islanders that migrated to the United States. “A rather broad term, ‘Asian/Pacific-Islander,’ encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji, and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia, and Easter Island).”

” … commemorate the first wave of Japanese immigrants on May 7, 1843. At the same time, it was to mark the anniversary of completing the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.”

May as the Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month is a commemorative month passed as a Public Law 102-450 in 1992 after a long history of changes beginning on October 5, 1978. President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution by Congress, which became Public Law 95-419.

They chose the month of May to commemorate the first wave of Japanese immigrants on May 7, 1843. At the same time, it was to mark the anniversary of completing the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants. You may read the entire report at this link.

Since my birth month is also at this time, perhaps it is appropriate and timely to mention the DNA analysis of our brood of 12 siblings, 11 of whom are in the US. One of my 11 full-blood siblings recently had an ancestral DNA test in the US. The DNA analysis of the Reyes siblings may illustrate the mingling of different races in Filipino blood.

The results showed that we, 12 full-blood Reyes siblings, have:

  • Filipino-&-Austronesian ancestry (from the period of 1890 to 1920).
  • Chinese ancestor (from the years of 1800 to 1860).
  • Indonesian, Thai, Khmer, and Myanmar (from the period of 1710 to 1800), and
  • Spanish & Portuguese (from the period of 1680 to 1800).

If you are interested or think that my siblings and I are your distant relatives, read first the details of my family’s ancestry in the pinned article of this Facebook Group.

By Austronesian, people speak from a family of languages — from Austronesia, including Formosan (Indigenous Taiwanese), Native-Filipino, Indonesian, Malay, Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian (Pacific-Islander) subfamilies or dialects.

On July 23-25, 2021, this columnist will present in a workshop my proposal of organizing a Club Pueblo Filipino in a Mexico International Trade and Business Summit at the Grand Isla Navidad Resort in Jalisco, Mexico, organized by the Federation of Philippine-American Chambers of Commerce (FPACC). Numeriano Bouffard, president of the FPACC of Orlando, FL, is also the prime mover of the Pueblo Filipino Project in Manzanillo, Colima Province of Mexico.

” … the “Filipino Melting Pot” — as an “economic budding empire” composed of more than 32-million families — would have been by then become one of the driving engines that could power the 2022-2050 “Mexican Industrial Revolution.”

Hopefully, by the end of June 2021, this column will provide more details about the proposed Club Pueblo Filipino. Also, our ideas of organizing similar to Filipino/North-American consortium-led resorts and entertainment retirement centers in Tennessee, Michigan, Ontario Province (Canada), and in several Philippine cities in a 25-year development program that will culminate in 2046. Yes, four years before Mexico hopefully reaches the status of being the world’s fifth-biggest economy in 2050. And perhaps, the “Filipino Melting Pot” — as an “economic budding empire” composed of more than 32-million families — would have been by then become one of the driving engines that could power the 2022-2050 “Mexican Industrial Revolution.”

Please find more details about the July 23-25, 2021, event at this link.

We hope the Jalisco (Mexico) event will be the equivalent of the first “baby steps” of a socioeconomic development voyage of thousands of miles. Yes, a journey of so many adventures in 25-years. Or even in a shorter time frame — to North America, starting in Mexico. Yes, a voyage of OFWs and Overseas Filipinos came from more than 100 countries.

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