First “EDEN America” Project in the U.S. Now on the Drawing Board

by Bobby Reyes

Mississippi at Night from the Mississippi River | Photo by JdKoenig via Wikipedia Commons CC PDM 1.0

Part XV of an “EDEN America” series

Numeriano Bouffard is the Pueblo Filipino founder and prime mover. This writer was one of the charter members of the Filipino-American Chamber of Commerce of San Gabriel Valley, headquartered in the City of West Covina, CA. He calls this columnist and says that the idea of a similar project in the United States is very attractive to one of his investor-friends. Mr. Bouffard is also the president of the Filipino-American Chamber of Commerce of Florida. He is also the president of the FPACC Foundation, Inc. The FPACC is the acronym of the Federation of Philippine-American Chambers of Commerce. In the late 1990s, the FACC-SGV affiliated with the FPACC.

Please type in “Pueblo Filipino” in the Search Box of www.philippinedailymirror.com and read what this columnist has so far written about the said project, based in Manzanillo City of Colima Province in Mexico. By the way, new readers need to know what “EDEN America” means. It is the acronym for “Economic-Development Evolution in North America.”

According to Mr. Bouffard, this particular investor wants to join a group that will push a U.S. version of Pueblo Filipino. The investor will put up an initial investment of $200-million. It will be easy to double or even quadruple this investment. How? By enticing the Filipino American communities to join the venture. We can start offering the business opportunity that can become a multi-billion mega cooperative-type of a juridical person in a matter of 10-to 15 years.

We can start meeting groups of Filipino medical professionals that have organized themselves into public-benefit associations and even alumni associations of their alma mater in the Philippines. There are approximately 600,000 Filipino nurses and 22,000 physicians in the United States.

“We can push the “TNsea.net” proposal of turning Tennessee into a socioeconomic “island” of opportunities. It will result in harnessing the Mississippi River, whose waters come from river tributaries from 33 states.”

By coincidence, a Filipino American power couple (husband is a physician and the wife is a nurse, cum community leaders) and their adult children from the Tri-States of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut are in Southern California for a week-long vacation. I will present to them the concept and schedule a town-hall meeting with hundreds of physicians and nurses invited in person or by Zoom or both, or other online means by the first quarter of 2022.

We can “sell” to Western U.S. states, even in the mid-West, where their aquifers are drying up. We can push the “TNsea.net” proposal of turning Tennessee into a socioeconomic “island” of opportunities. It will result in harnessing the Mississippi River, whose waters come from river tributaries from 33 states. After all, the waters of the “Old Man River” empty into the Gulf of Mexico. We can pipe the semi-treated waters to the aquifers, and Mother Nature will do the final filtering and cleaning over the years.

As the “TNsea Project” takes off, it will be accompanied by helping remake initially rural areas along the Mississippi River and turning them into “smart towns and cities.” Then building retirement homes and houses for the workers — at affordable prices at co-op development rates. And support infrastructures from medical facilities (starting with small clinics, so that towns in the 33 states will need at least a physician, nurses, and medical staff that will be the local First Responders).

The project can build electric-powered commuter rail systems and train stations to be the site of new modern “smart towns.” And even rebuild the medical infrastructures and abandoned malls, and dying Main Street businesses. And turn them into distribution centers. We can push all these projects as “Public-Private Partnerships.”

“The project can build electric-powered commuter rail systems and train stations to be the site of new modern “smart towns.” And even rebuild the medical infrastructures and abandoned malls, and dying Main Street businesses.”

But first things first. Signing up for a joint-venture agreement (JVA) with the said first investor before Christmas Eve 2021. And then doing the same JVAs with the private-and-public entities, starting in Tennessee? Why settle for Tennessee to begin the development? I will explain this in the Straphanger this coming Wednesday.

Then if more American-and-Mexican stakeholders join, we can do the same development concept for the huge Rio Grande along the U.S.-Mexican border. And deal smartly with problems like homelessness, Climate Change, illegal migration, pollution, lack of medical and other infrastructures. And in so doing, we assist Mexicans to turn their country into the fifth-largest economy in the world by 2050. This column has written about it also. Just type in “BAMOS” at this online site’s Search Box.

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2 comments

Roberto M. Reyes November 14, 2021 - 9:56 am

Here’s the Intro Note to the shared article in my Timeline and many Facebook Groups and Pages: As the adage says, “a voyage of a thousand miles begins with the first step.” Actually, OFWs and Overseas Filipinos — 16-million of them — have taken countless steps but not on a synchronized way and without much stake in the firms and medical centers that hired them. We hope to invite them to be co-op member-stakeholders.

Reply
Numeriano V Bouffard November 15, 2021 - 8:53 am

Querido Roberto,
As you said it all starts with the first step. We are
Part of history with the Españas meaning the hispanic counties in the Americas. The word Pueblo means Village and we also belong to the hispanic village for more than 3 centuries. . So it takes a Pueblo to make it a success. Muchas gracias Amigo.

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