Florida Is the Future

by Bobby Reyes

(L-R) Valdez Venita (Val) Demings, Nicole Heather (Nikki) Fried | PDM composite photo via Wikimedia Commons

Part LI of the “EDEN America” Series

Yes, Florida is the Future. And the Future’s seeds of progress will sprout come November. The new-elected Democratic slates for the state, congressional and senatorial, city, and local posts should cultivate and grow the socioeconomic projects included in the party’s platform that they presented first to the voters during the campaign.

Once again, this columnist’s “guardian angel” woke up this columnist’s subconscious with a dream yesterday morning just before dawn. The angel (or whatever name my literary critics call the messenger) amplified the series of visions that were delivered to this writer when he started “The Straphanger” column in November 2020.

The vision says that Floridians will elect two-woman political leaders of Florida this November — after they overwhelmingly win their Democratic primary elections in August.

This columnist can only think of two lady leaders. The first is Ms. Valdez Venita (Val) Demings. She is an American politician elected in 2017 as a Democratic candidate to Florida’s 10th congressional district. The district covers most of the western half of the City of Orlando and includes much of the area around Orlando’s resort parks. Before she was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Val Demings was the chief of the Orlando Police Department from 2007–2011. Congresswoman Demings is a senior citizen, a “Baby Bloomer” (sic, as this columnist coined). She is an Afro-American public servant with Hispanic first-and-second names. She is now running in the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Marco Rubio, a failed Republican and still a wannabee presidential aspirant.

The second lay leader is Nicole Heather (Nikki) Fried, an American lawyer, and politician. She has served as the 12th Florida Commissioner of Agriculture since 2019. A member of the Democratic Party, she is one of the youngest candidates at age 44 to seek the governorship of Florida. She faces an incumbent Republican governor, who is also a wannabe presidential candidate if former President Trump does not run in 2024.

Why did fate choose the two woman leaders? Aha, this journalist remembers a joke that after Father’s Day (celebrated last Sunday), the next 365 days — or 366 days if it is a leap year — are Mother’s (or the Matriarch’s) Days.

This columnist asks why Val Demings and Nikki Fried are supposedly chosen to lead Floridians to their Promised Land. The visionary messenger says that in the 2024 presidential election if President Biden runs for re-election, he is aware that — with due respect to Vice President Kamala Harris — with any other running mate that Mr. Biden chooses, it will not matter in the Golden State. Why? Because the Biden-led slate will carry the perennial Democratic state that is California. On the other hand, if Mr. Biden does not run (for any reason at all), the winner of the Democratic presidential primary elections may look favorably to either Val Demings or Nikki Fried as the running mate. Provided that Democrat presidential standard-bearer is not a woman or comes from an adjacent or nearby state (because of geographical considerations in national politics).

And provided further that a Sen. Val Demings and, or a Gov. Nikki Fried succeed — beyond the wildest dreams of their opponents — in their respective posts in their first two years in office.

Political pundits (and even “angel-messengers”) always point to the presidential election of 2000 between George W. Bush and Al Gore. Florida, the nation’s third-most populous state, determined the winner. Florida has always been a toss-up state, but sadly, the winning candidate for the presidency did not push its socioeconomic development to become even the third-most industrialized state in the union — as the ultimate reward to Floridians for helping elect him to the presidency.

“… if Mr. Biden does not run (for any reason at all), the winner of the Democratic presidential primary elections may look favorably to either Val Demings or Nikki Fried as the running mate. Provided that Democrat presidential standard-bearer is not a woman or comes from an adjacent or nearby state (because of geographical considerations in national politics).”

Erstwhile Chief Financial Officer (CFO) aspirant Ty Javellana informed this columnist that healthcare was one of the primary reasons he wanted to run for the said position. In last week’s column, “The Straphanger” said that Ty Javellana told this writer that, like so-many Floridians, he is so-disappointed by Florida’s ranking in Healthcare (#25), Healthcare Access (#41), Healthcare Quality (#18) and in Public Health (#13). Mr. Javellana is a Floridian of Filipino descent who is (was) aspiring to win the Democratic primary election for Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of Florida. The CFO is elected state-wide. He is the first CFO aspirant from Florida’s Asian and Pacific-Islander communities.

Incidentally, Mr. Javellana was advised by his physician to postpone to another year his electoral bid, as he was still confined in a Florida hospital (even at press time) fighting several serious ailments. (The deadline for filing the certificate of candidacy was last Thursday.) He referred to the doctor’s advice. This columnist told him that his withdrawal was a wise move, for it was like taking a single step backward, but it was actually at the same time taking two steps forward.

Yes, Mr. Javellana and his fellow Floridian Democrats have a point — considering that Florida is the third-biggest state, population-wise, with 22.2-million residents. But it lags in the healthcare rankings of the American union of 50 states.

Egad, the current Republican leaders of Florida, including the GOP presumed moral leader, Mr. Trump (now legally a resident of Florida), have not done much to take care even of the state’s healthcare system (pun intended).

In the next column, this journalist will discuss a 10-point socioeconomic agenda for the Democratic slates of Florida that he presented then to Mr. Javellana. Then the plan was for him, as the winner of the CFO primary, to submit it to all the Democratic slates in Florida. Hopefully, the Democratic candidates will decide to incorporate the said suggestions into their socioeconomic platforms. Yes, even if Mr. Javellana is no longer a candidate for CFO.

Next Wednesday, we will discuss with the reading public what our Filipino-American group of political pundits suggested for healthcare and economics and solutions for other problems for Florida and the whole United States, if not North America.

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