How the “Renaissance” Impacts Socioeconomically Tennessee and the Other States

by Bobby Reyes

Memphis, TN Bridge | Photo by Terrance Raper on Unsplash

Part XXV of the “EDEN America” Series

A columnist receives a series of well-meaning comments from time to time. Such is the case of Ms. Barbara Ross. She remarked in my posting in the “Tennessee Democrats and National Issues” (TD&NI) Facebook Group.

Barbara Ross started her series of comments by asking this simple question: “Why the Filipino interest in the Mississippi River?”

This columnist replied: “Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Barbara Ross. It was more or less the same query asked by my new friend, Ms. Thalia Young, who invited me to join this Facebook Group. I actually mentioned already some of the reasons why I registered the domain name www.TNsea.net that I said might lead to helping your beloved Tennessee become an ‘island.’ Initially, it was just a metaphorical version of an isle as the ‘Island of Las Vegas in Nevada. You will perhaps start to appreciate my group’s and my own interest — as the group’s prime mover — in eventually being able to help TN become a major economic power not only in the U.S.A. but also in North America. Pls just type in the website’s Search Box the keywords TNsea.net and/or FedEx.

“(Con’t.) I will soon publish a summary for the reasons why we may be able to lead the nearly 5-million Americans of Filipino descent to join us in pushing the ‘Old-Man River’ projects, including the downstream projects that may be able able to generate hundreds of thousands of new jobs. It goes as far as 1899 (when the U.S. invaded the Philippine Islands during the Spanish-American War). And making the Filipino archipelago America’s first colony after defeating Spain. BTW Ms. Thalia Young is helping us complete our research on the TN Volunteers (and Buffalo Solders from TN) that were sent (from 1899-1902) by the U.S. Army to fight the then-fledgling Filipino Army, as Filipinos declared their independence from Spain on June 12, 1898. As I have written before, many of my proposals about the ‘Economic-Development Evolution in North (EDEN) America’ are like voyages of thousands of miles. But nothing will happen if the people of the 33 states that provide water to the Mississippi River do not take the first step (or a series of baby steps). The people of TN can initiate everything and make the first steps.”

Barbara Ross replied: “@Bobby M. Reyes We (Tennessee) sort of are already an ‘economic power,’ thank you. As to being one of the states that provides water to the Mississippi, in case you hadn’t noticed, we have the Tennessee Valley Authority. The Mississippi is actually quite well-developed.

“As to that whole colony thing, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States for $20,000,000 in 1898, and the Philippines have been an independent nation since July 4, 1946.

“So what exactly is the Filipino interest in the Mississippi River?

With due respect to Ms.Barbara, Ms. Thalia (the Grand Dame of Democratic pundits and humorists of Tennessee), I’d say their beloved state is not yet a recognized “economic power.” The more than 2,300 members of the TD&NI Facebook group, their political and business leaders should also be aware of that fact. Some references rank it as number 30 in the 50 states from the economic viewpoint and other metrics.

“If other needed medical workers and Overseas Filipinos call Tennesse their adopted home, its schools – their alma mater, and Tennessee firms – their employers, they can contribute to an “Economic Renaissance” and more.”

According to Google, in 2019, Tennessee’s socioeconomic status ranked 29th in the U.S. based on 71 metrics across eight categories. Healthcare quality, 23; healthcare access, 37; and public health, 43. Please read the references cited by the U.S. News at this link for interested readers.

I have been writing about the 2019 pre-pandemic prediction of the World Health Organization that “there would be a 6-million shortage of Board-certified nurses by 2030.” I have been saying that Filipino (and American of Filipino descent) nurses can quickly fill half of that shortage. The Great State of Tennessee and it’s business and political leaders can help this ambitious program of fielding half of the coming world shortage of nurses (and presumably other medical professionals). Imagine, 3-million or more Filipino and Filipino-American medical professionals being partly (or entirely) educated, trained, licensed, and Board certified in Tennessee.

If other needed medical workers and Overseas Filipinos call Tennesse their adopted home, its schools – their alma mater, and Tennessee firms – their employers, they can contribute to an “Economic Renaissance” and more. These exceptionally trained employees will do the various projects for the Old Man River “Renaissance” idea. The projects can double the current 7-million population of Tennessee by 2030 to 2040. For sure, nobody else has proposed these goals, plans, and programs for Tennessee and beyond — except this column in the Philippine Daily Mirror.

By 2030, Tennessee may rank in the healthcare quality No. 2, healthcare access, No. 3, and public-health, No. 4. By then, a health-maintenance organization (HMO) may become the biggest of its kind in the 33 states that are parts of the Mississippi River Deltas. What more if cooperatives formed by the medical workers, the subscribers, and local governments own the HMO?

” … Americans of Filipino descent (equivalent to some 5/7th of Tennessee’s population) also care about the future of this country, North America, and the end of Planet Earth. Without sustainable freshwater sources, crops will not grow, it cannot quench humanity’s thirst and even fight forest fires.”

And as I said, the Americans of Filipino descent (equivalent to some 5/7th of Tennessee’s population) also care about the future of this country, North America, and the end of Planet Earth. Without sustainable freshwater sources, crops will not grow, it cannot quench humanity’s thirst and even fight forest fires. And as for me personally, I am fighting for a better future for my seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren (who are all American citizens).

When Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. was the 45th vice president of the United States from 1993 to 2001 (under President Bill Clinton), our group sent to his office the same “Old Man River” proposal through an intermediary. Perhaps our contact did not believe in our proposal and threw it into the wastebasket. Or Mr. Gore received it, but he or his staff never bothered to read it. Had he started the process in 1993, he would have won hands down the presidency in the 2000 election. And to think that Mr. Gore even lost in his home state of Tennessee.

This columnist is optimistic that the people of Tennessee and their leaders will listen to this proposal. Why are we hopeful? Because the Bible says that “no prophet is believed in his own hometown.” It was probably why Mr. Gore lost in his home state in 2000. But we are outsiders that come up with this grand vision for Tennessee and the Mississippi River. Ergo

Leave a Comment

X