How to find funding to vaccinate 90-million Filipinos in 90-Days

by Bobby Reyes

“Bitcoins and Cryptocurrency coins” | Photo by Crypto360 via Flickr/Creative Commons

Part XII of “The Filipino Melting Pot” Series

The Overseas-Filipino communities and the OFWs — in cooperation with the Filipino Melting Pot families — can help the private and public sectors of the Filipino homeland get all medically fit Filipinos vaccinated in just 90 days. It will require at least two months to prepare and procure the needed vaccines, medical supplies, electronic medical equipment, and computers. And another month to deliver the second doses for the last-vaccine recipients. So, all in all, just six months are needed. It will guarantee a “herd immunity,” as the nearly 800,000 (by May 2021) would have by then anti-bodies in them to fight off the coronavirus. And even provide the needed plasma to be used as a viral therapeutic medicine.

As of Apr. 19, 2021, 21:42 GMT, the Worldometers Info on Coronavirus (PH) posted this data: Coronavirus Cases: 945,745; Deaths:16,048; and Recovered (Patients): 788,322. Please go to this link to look at the daily and monthly graphs of cases, deaths, and recovered patients.

It is a race against time. But if we can start this project by June 2021 — let’s make sure to inoculate all the task force members first. It means all the medical personnel (from private-and-public hospitals, health centers, and clinics), members of the military, and police medical corps (as aided by all the men and women in law-enforcement uniforms. It also includes firefighters and all students of the country’s medical, nursing, and other related learning institutions. Of course, all the other volunteers, especially the retired medical professionals within and outside of the PH. The team members and their family members will have to get the vaccines first.

“It is a race against time. But if we can start this project by June 2021 — let’s make sure to inoculate all the task force members first.”

An injection of all willing COVID-negative Filipinos (from age 16) can begin on Jul. 1, 2021. By Christmas Eve-2021, the assurance of a “herd mentality” will be the best Advent gift of the government, the private sector, and the Filipino Melting Pot. Of course, the project needs the help of the United States, and other foreign governments, international agencies from the United Nations to the World Health Organization, and foundations like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Bloomberg Philanthropies, and its Bloomberg Institute of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University and other benefactors.

Suppose more human and financial resources are available. In that case, we can launch a collateral movement that will improve the diet of Filipinos so that they can fight off the medical diseases caused by diabetes. There are more than 50,000 Filipinos that die from complications caused by diabetes. At the same time, the movement can provide healthier food on the Filipino table. And eliminate the rice crisis and end the shortages of chicken, pork, and beef.

On Apr. 5, 2018, (20-months before the COVID-caused pandemic hit the U.S. and the PH), I sent a letter to President Duterte through the Philippine Consulate General of Los Angeles, CA. Readers may view this letter at this link.

At the same time, we can order all the medical equipment, including ventilators and other breathing accessories, to retrofit (and make them all state-of-the-art) in every provincial and public hospital in their ICUs.

At the same time, we can launch a third collateral movement of computerizing all medical infrastructures and provide a personal computer each to all registered medical professionals and students in the country’s medical and nursing schools. We can team up with the Microsoft Corporation and the Gates Foundation and order a complete computer manufacturing company, as well as a manufacturing facility to produce Bill Gates’s $3-vaccine (as discussed in Part XI of this series).

At the same time, we can order all the medical equipment, including ventilators and other breathing accessories, to retrofit (and make them all state-of-the-art) in every provincial and public hospital in their ICUs. Aside from the proposed “I2D2-cryptocurrency” discussed earlier in this series, the United States Export and Import Bank (Eximbank) can fund all these.

They may order all the needed vaccines and the necessary equipment — from needles to portable cold-storage chests and personal protection equipment. And funded again by the Eximbank, as may be backed by the proposed I2D2-cryptocurrency option.

This column also has suggested to President Biden on Jan. 31, 2021, how the United States could help fight pandemics by copying the first Medical Center as done by then-Civil Governor William Howard Taft in the City of Manila in the early 1900s. And doing it in 50 countries, starting with the PH.

The Biden Administration can facilitate the approval of the Eximbank loans and the rapid acquisition and shipping by air to destinations in the PH. Again, the Eximbank can fund even the charges by the Federal Express (FedEx).

“The PH is perhaps one of the few countries that can do this bold and unprecedented mission of inoculating 90-million individuals in a matter of six months, maximum.”

The PH is perhaps one of the few countries that can do this bold and unprecedented mission of inoculating 90-million individuals in a matter of six months, maximum. And at the same time, also do the other suggested movements of reinventing a country’s diet and retrofitting the existing medical facilities and infrastructures. There are now more than 600,000 Filipino nurses and 22,000 Filipino physicians in the U.S., aside from hundreds of more Filipino medical professionals, healthcare and caregiving employees, and technicians. And more millions of Filipino nurses and physicians, and other healthcare workers are available for more training and deployment in critical areas of the world.

If they implement the above-stated suggestions successfully, perhaps the world may ask the Filipino Melting Pot to replicate it in the other Third-World countries that are having difficulty coping with the pandemic. Can the world afford not to?

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