“Old-Man River” Plans Can Be Templates for Other Rivers in the World

by Bobby Reyes

| Photo by W. Wolfgang via Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0

Part XXI of the “EDEN America” Series

Today some bottled-water brands are more expensive, ounce for ounce, than gasoline. By the 22nd century or even earlier, some oil-producing countries would not export their “black gold,” as demand would almost be negligible. And they cannot drink crude oil or even turn it into coffee, tea, or beer. Countries with an ample supply of fresh (and potable) water will be economically dominant. (Desalination plants require too much energy to produce water, and its by-products, like salt, are beginning to lose their marketability. For salt is terrible for the health, and highly salty seawater is toxic for the marine environment.)

This column started with the proposition that the Filipino American communities have mainly sought good-paying jobs, mainly in the U.S. healthcare industry as medical professionals, healthcare workers, and caregivers of Filipino, or part-Filipino, descent. This columnist began discussing how Overseas-Filipino workers (OFWs) and Overseas Filipinos could help protect and promote the socio-economic development of the most significant rivers in the United States and North America.

Then I started a series of articles about how the American-Mexican Border (AMB) could become Ground Zero of the “Elementary, Mr. Watson” type of advocacy. If we could launch a series of projects in the AMB, it would generate waves of interest among the policy and decision-makers of both countries. Yes, elementary and back-to-basics projects like building natural border walls composed of the BAMOS, an acronym that I coined. It means “Bamboo, Abaca, Moringa and Other Species” of trees, cacti, herbs, and vegetation that would also protect and enhance river tributaries providing water to the Rio Grande that separates both countries. Yes, we can argue that a natural wall of one-mile deep of bamboos can deter not only illegal crossing of migrants but likewise illegal-drug mules, gun smugglers, and other problematic flows of traffic.

“It means “Bamboo, Abaca, Moringa and Other Species” of trees, cacti, herbs, and vegetation that would also protect and enhance river tributaries providing water to the Rio Grande that separates both countries.”

And this column argued that the final solution would be helping Mexico become the fifth-biggest economy in the world, as explained by former Mexican President Vicente Fox before a business meeting sponsored by the Milken Institute in 2014. Mr. Fox said that Mexico’s earliest that status as an economic power would be 2050.

Doing the BAMOS Strategy would secure the border and provide so many socio-economic benefits for the United States and Mexico. It can help produce food for the hungry, housing materials for the homeless, jobs for the unemployed, and water to do massive reforestation and drastically curtail forest fires. There will be downstream projects, too, that will do more for the economic development of American states or Mexican provinces along with the AMB.

To read the BAMOS Strategy, readers may want to type in “BAMOS” in the Search Box of www.philippinedailymirror.com. And to read more about the economic future of Mexico and Central America, they can search for “Vicente Fox” in it.

” …I inquired about the global thirst for fresh water and how converted huge crude-oil tankers could carry fresh water on their way back to the original port of exit. They informed me that it was feasible from the engineering viewpoint. “

In closing for this Sunday’s column, let me relate an incident 7-years ago. The Consulate General of Azerbaijan invited this journalist to cover a one-day conference on the “Energy Corridor at the Caspian Sea.” The meeting was at the University of Southern California in 2014. During the Q&A portion, I inquired about the global thirst for fresh water and how converted huge crude-oil tankers could carry fresh water on their way back to the original port of exit. They informed me that it was feasible from the engineering viewpoint. I cited that Azerbaijan has more than 8,000 rivers, although not as big as the Mississippi River or the Rio Grande. Azerbaijan, therefore, would be a key player if someday, we could organize an “Organization of Water-Exporting Countries” (OWEC).

I have also written that volcanoes are active in many Pacific Islands. Where there are volcanoes, there are also lots of brooks, springs, and rivers in their surroundings. For instance, my home province of Sorsogon has two volcanic ranges and 50 rivers. While it is one of the smallest provinces in the Philippines, Sorsogon can be a major water exporter and possibly the ASEAN headquarters of the OWEC if someday it were organized. Why give the honor to Sorsogon? Because this journalist — to his limited knowledge — was the first to bat for the organization of the OWEC.

And this columnist organized years ago this Facebook Group called “Sorsogon Rivers and Other Bodies of Water.”

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