Why Filipinos May Proclaim Themselves “God’s Chosen People”

by Bobby Reyes

| Photo by Marco Verch via Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0

Part X of an “EDEN America” series

Mar G. de Vera posted a comment about this thread: “Unless some, or maybe some, of the Filipinos, have drops of Israelites’ blood — through genes and chromosomes — they’re part of the chosen people. Other than that, no way would a Filipino or Fil-Ams could become chosen individuals.” Mr. De Vera is a Los Angeles, California-based book author, editor, and journalist.

This columnist replies to Mr. De Vera that there is no need for Filipinos, especially Overseas Filipinos and OFWs, to have Israeli blood or even Jewish heritage. Why? Because the hypothesis — as argued in this series — is that Filipinos are not part, or even an extension, of the original “God’s Chosen People.” The idea is for Filipinos to emulate the Jewish people and proclaim themselves as “God’s Chosen People” for the 22nd century — starting in North America, followed by the Philippines.

Also, I suggest that Filipinos, especially those who work or have settled abroad, must do more than the Jewish faith’s first “God’s chosen people.” As discussed earlier in this column, the Filipino homeland is several civilizations’ “melting pot.” And the Philippines (as an American colony) became the temporary home of thousands of White-Russian refugees after the 1918 Bolshevik Revolution. And the sanctuary of thousands of Jewish refugees in the late 1930s, after they fled their Eastern-European homes to evade certain death from their Nazi oppressors.

OFWs and Overseas Filipinos need to start helping this world become less of an “economic purgatory,” especially in this age of a pandemic, domestic and foreign terrorism, growing international homelessness, poverty, lack of universal healthcare, etcetera, ad infinitum.

“OFWs and Overseas Filipinos need to start helping this world become less of an “economic purgatory, …”

For our dear readers who missed the said column, they can click this link. There is a need for OFWs and Overseas Filipinos to start helping this world less of an “economic purgatory.” Particularly in the present age of a pandemic, domestic-and-foreign terrorism, growing international homelessness, poverty, lack of universal healthcare, etcetera, ad infinitum. Yes, why not let millions of Overseas Filipinos (even if they are the self-proclaimed “God’s chosen people” for the 22nd century”) modestly push for at least a semblance of a socioeconomic paradise on Earth, starting in North America?

As predicted by 2030, there should be at least 3.5-million Filipino nurses in North America, including some 600,000 American and Canadian nurses of Filipino descent (who now compose some of America’s heroic “Frontliners” that are taking care of those hospitalized due to the COVID-19 disease). They can help the inhabitants of North America become healthier. Yes, starting with the obesity problem, as obesity leads to diabetes, brings more healthcare problems. Obesity, diabetes, and other existing medical conditions contribute to many deaths during these trying times of a pandemic.

“For a start, Filipino healthcare professionals and caregivers can lead North Americans to a “Promised Land of Good Health” via the ways of good nutrition and exercise.”

As Googled, nearly 40% of American adults aged 20 and over are obese. 71.6% of adults aged 20 and over are overweight, including obesity. Up North, according to Statistics Canada, 61.3% of adult Canadians were overweight or obese in 2015. The percentage of those who were obese rose to 26.7%, up from 23.1% in 2004. And Down South, Mexico is one of the most worrying cases. About 73% of the Mexican population in 2020 was overweight (compared to one-fifth of the people in 1996). Mexico has one of the highest rates of obesity in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. In addition, 34% of obese are morbidly obese — the highest level of obesity.

For a start, Filipino healthcare professionals and caregivers can lead North Americans to a “Promised Land of Good Health” via the ways of good nutrition and exercise. Remarkably, Moses and Jesus Christ, and the other prophets followed a strict regimen of healthy foods, good nutrition, and walking as their primary exercise. Their healthy diet and lifestyle led to the development of Kosher food. Our Islamic brethren also adopted this and called their version, Halal food.

Pacific Islanders and the earlier inhabitants of the Philippine archipelago had a similar diet. This writer moved to revive the so-called “Pacific-Islander Diet” on May 1, 2017, and I came up with this Facebook Group. Within 22 months, I lost 22-to-27 lbs., lowered my Body-Mass Index (BMI) to less than 24, cured myself of Type-2 diabetes (as confirmed by my HMO primary physician through blood tests). I was allowed to discontinue a 500-mg Metformin tablet; I also did away with 2-to-4 caplets of Tylenol for my arthritis. My cholesterol and blood pressure also stabilized.

The ancient Hawaiian diet is similar to the Pacific-Islander Diet (www.pidiet.com). I also discussed this in the said Facebook Group.

I predict that policy-and-decision-makers in North America and the Philippines will eventually support this series of initiatives anchored on first establishing the “Promised Land of Good Health.” Here is one proof: Amb. Gary Domingo, the Filipino envoy to New Zealand, commented in his personal capacity on Facebook: “I love the message — my take is though that there are elements of Moses and Jesus in all of us … not just one, singular personification . . .”

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